Freedom of Soul and Body




A Stone of Hope

Just in time for this weekend, The Maccabeats, a Yeshiva University-based a capella group, left behind its usual Jewish setting of lyrics, subjects, and New York or Israel backgrounds for something seemingly very different. They joined forces with Naturally 7, an African-American a capella group, to cover James Taylor’s song “Shine A Little Light” on the site of the Lincoln and Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorials. You can watch the video here. I say seemingly different because there is much about the effort that is consistent with Judaism.

These weeks, Jews are reading the Book of Exodus in our liturgical cycle. Right now, we are moving from the ten plagues to the Exodus itself. Is it a coincidence that this story will be the focus of study and sermons right as we Americans commemorate MLK’s birthday? Jewishly, there are no coincidences; God’s “personal supervision” hashgachah prateet, challenges us to find the meaning of this fateful concurrence. In the soaring rhetoric of MLK’s “I Have a Dream” speech, there is much to match the Song of the Sea sung by Miriam, Moses, and the Israelites after their safe crossing. The Israelites’ journey from slavery to freedom serves as such a strong basis for hope that a Negro spiritual “Go Down, Moses” has even worked its way back to Jewish Passover celebrations. From Moses’s prophetic voice to MLK’s prophetic call, the human aspiration to be free resounds.

It is little surprise then that The Maccabeats and Naturally 7 would eventually work together on a project like “Shine A Little Light.” This weekend is a time to “recognize that there are ties between us / . . . Ties of hope and love” to quote the song. With MLK’s dream not yet fulfilled and the American dream in question for so many, the call to freedom still speaks. And yet, that divine pronouncement of the worth of each individual is, today, only a whisper.

51nX2wGTFXL._SX333_BO1,204,203,200_In the last year, I have been drawn to the writings of Ta-Nehisi Coates. A number of my colleagues describe him as a contemporary prophet, especially in his book Between the World and Me. In an early sequence of the book, he contends with the emphasis on freedom of the spirit in America’s Biblical and civil rights narratives. He asks, “how do I live free in this black body? It is a profound question because America understands itself as God’s handiwork, but the black body is the clearest evidence that America is the work of me.” In his articles for The Atlantic, Coates has extended this bodily emphasis to survivors of rape. His argument is that for all our hopes and for all our progress towards equality, we have many counter-narratives that embed “animus” that “plunders the body” of the oppressed.

Today, I fear, we need more than songs and speeches. We need a movement to freedom that focuses also on the body. Whether it be race, sex, or gender, we need to acknowledge that our attempts to judge each other “by the content of [our] character” fall flat if we forget the pain that the bodies of others have endured. As a white Jew, I get a pass on much of that pain, and yet I recognize, too, that the Nazis developed extensive theories about the Jewish body that made it easier to destroy those bodies. I don’t know how to free the bodies of the oppressed in our society. I do wonder, though, if empathy is a key.

The prophet Elijah, who is also said to be the one to announce the coming of the Messiah, tried to relive Moses’s experience at Mount Sinai. He failed to find God’s voice in the wind, in an earthquake, and in fire; he heard God’s voice in the sound of silence. Silence has a sound when two people sit together, awkwardly or lovingly. Perhaps, this weekend and going forward we can hear God’s still, small voice when we stop judging character and instead listen to the many ways someone else is afraid for their body, for their life, and begin from there to free ourselves, soul and body, into a better world. May You “Shed a little light, oh Lord / So that we can see.”face_vase


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Articulating a School’s Core Beliefs

Core Beliefs WordleAs a Head of School, it is my job to find the words. It is my job to remind everyone what should already be evident and to teach it to those first encountering us. I have other significant roles; this one, though, is one I cherish. I cherish the chance to articulate the school’s values because Albert Einstein Academy is not just school; it is an investment. As a school, we are being asked to articulate our core beliefs as part of our re-accreditation process. Our core beliefs encompass much more, though, than our school; our core beliefs establish what we do for the community. Core beliefs are more than mission; they pave the way to mission fulfillment.

We have a stated mission to set our sights in a particular direction; it is like our Torah. To know how we achieve our mission and why we choose certain paths, we need a “Mishnah,” of core beliefs. Below, please find a draft of AEA’s Core Beliefs. This draft reflects feedback from the faculty, staff, and the board of directors. It is still a draft. I welcome your feedback, too, positive or negative, grammatical or philosophical.

The list incorporates many Jewish ideas and teachings. Each belief has a consequence for what we do. Taken together, the list also demonstrates how AEA goes beyond a K-5 schooling.

We are what we believe, particularly when belief is put into action. Our statement of core beliefs indicates the value-proposition we are making. Our community and our world benefit from students who see value in themselves and others, who seek to understand the world and its differences, who take responsibility with love and without fear, and who bring honor and dignity to what they do. AEA is an incubator for a vibrant, meaningful future for our students, our community, and the world. As an institution, AEA is an investment in that future, may we merit it soon.aea new admission logo

Our Core Beliefs

 Albert Einstein said, “I never teach my pupils, I only provide conditions in which they can learn.” We draw on the following core beliefs to provide these conditions at AEA:

בצלם א-להים ברא אותם

(b’tzelem e-lohim bara otam: In God’s image, God created them.)

We believe that each person, having been created in God’s image, has divine value. As such, we educate the whole student, using multiple modalities and differentiating instruction for each according to his/her way.

 ראשית חכמה יראת ה׳

(raysheet chokhmah yirat haShem: The beginning of wisdom is awe of God.)

We believe that curiosity manifested in asking questions is the path to wisdom. As such, we encourage our students to see the world with awe and wonder, to be inquisitive, and to think critically.

 אלו ואלו דברים א-להים חיים

(elu v’elu d’varim e-lohim chayim: These and those are the words of the living God.)

We believe that “these and those,” as sides of a debate, represent equally meaningful manifestations of one living world. As such, our pluralism respects different commitments that reach for one truth, and our academic curriculum is integrated across subjects to reflect that oneness.

 ערבות הדדית

(arvut hadadit: mutual responsibility)

We believe that we are each responsible for the other. As such, we teach personal and communal responsibility. We regularly explore social justice and freedom as part of responsibility to the wider community.

 אהבת ישראל

(ahavat yisrael: love of Israel)

We believe that love of the Jewish tradition drives our efforts. As such, we live Jewish values and practices daily. We teach Hebrew as the language of the Jewish people. We actively forge a positive relationship to Torah and the State of Israel.

 כל העולם כולו גשר צר מאוד,והעיקר לא לפחד כלל

(kol ha’olam kooloh gesher tzar me’ohd, v’ha’eeqar lo lefahched klal: All the world is a narrow bridge and what is essential is not to be afraid at all.)

We believe that living and learning are a lifelong journey. As such, we teach that it is essential to try new things and encourage experimentation. We teach that mistakes are opportunities for learning; failing forward builds confidence and deepens knowledge.

 הדר כבוד הודך

(hadar kavod hohdekha: the honorable dignity of Your glory)

We believe our purpose is sacred. As such, we conduct ourselves with honor and dignity by cultivating good character and by striving for excellence. We take and teach personal ownership for our self-presentation, for our learning, for our school, for our community, and for the future.


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Learning from the Tech Journey

Flickr_-_Nicholas_T_-_Open_RoadHave you ever just gone for a drive with no specific destination in mind? Have you ever wandered around a mall or a small town just to see what’s there? Or, have you ever been traveling to some place and been sidetracked?

Most of our lives are directed to a destination–work, school, home, a vacation spot, the store, etc.. When the distance is short or routine, we take our arrival for granted. When we wander, though, the journey changes our arrival and it changes us.

PrintThis Sunday is the Global Day of Jewish Learning. Elementary schools are encouraged to learn about Abraham (known as Abram in the material) and his journey from his homeland to a land that God would show him. Rashi, the great French medieval commentator, notes about Genesis 12:2 that “God did not reveal to him (Abraham) the land immediately in order to make it dear in his (Abraham’s) eyes.” That is a lesson in itself, arriving at a previously undisclosed location can make that arrival more sweet.

As Albert Einstein Academy (AEA) journey’s into the future of education, I want to add another lesson from Abraham’s experience to our learning: Abraham’s journey brought many others along with him and with his wife Sarah because their values led the way. It is true that Abraham and Sarah answered God’s call to go forth to a place that God would show them. We also read that they took with them “the soul of those they made in Haran” (Gen. 12:5). It was in Haran that Abraham supposedly broke the idols in his father’s shop (the story is not actually in the Torah; it is midrash, or rabbinic myth). As he and Sarah established themselves and shared their values, others joined their cause.

aea new admission logoWe are on a journey based on values. At AEA, we value each individual as an image of God and a unique gift. We aim to foster inquisitive learners, critical thinkers, and dynamic leaders, which requires us to seek the educational development of students’ academic, emotional, and moral capacities. I am so grateful to our families for joining us on the journey because of our values.

Technology is just a tool to accomplish our goals. While new computers may seem like the destination, the real arrival place is success in life. We have opened doors to new possible ways of fulfilling our mission by incorporating technology into our teaching. More is to come. With new tools, we are already developing inquiry, critical thinking, and leadership skills through collaborative work, especially in Google Docs. With new tools (like Ariot CAL for Hebrew already in our school and Everyday Math 4, hopefully coming soon), we can work on individualizing student gains in fun, engaging ways that will give us specific data by which to measure progress. The tools are not the goal; they help us achieve our goals.




As our technology journey advances, we may not know the end point (especially since technology changes so much). We do know why we are using this path. We do know that our students need to understand how to make the journey work for them (that’s why we also teach coding). Most of all, we know that for our current families and for anyone else to join us on the journey, the real destination is the fulfillment of our values. Thanks  again to those wandering with us.


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Autumn Joy



Can you command joy? If by command we mean tell someone to do something, it seems highly unlikely that one could command someone else to feel or show joy. On the other hand, if by command we mean draw full attention, well, perhaps we should investigate what would draw our full attention to feeling and to showing joy.

On the festival of Sukkot, we are told V’Samachta b’Chagekha (to be joyous on our holiday). In some sense that is easy. Who isn’t happy to have a holiday (especially if there is no penalty for not working)? Sukkot, though, adds an odd dimension. It’s a holiday when we go out of the comfort of our homes into outdoor huts, usually at the start of the rainy season. Autumn may be beautiful, but it can sure be cold, dark, and dreary. Where is the joy in that?

P1120167Monday’s Albert Einstein Academy Jewish Day School all-school field trip to HersheyPark for Chol HaMoed Sukkot Day offers an answer. Tablet Magazine’s article “A Holiday Pilgrimage to an Amusement Park” explains more about the day itself. Our trip, though, was all about getting out of our usual routine for a long day in the dreary mist, all in the name of joy.

It is fun to ride rollercoasters and smaller rides at an amusement park. It is super-sweet to tour the Hershey’s Chocolate World factory tour and get a sample of their candy; Hershey is “the sweetest place on earth.” It is also incredibly empowering to be somewhere secular and to have only kosher food available, with sukkot set up nearby to eat it in!

Monday, our whole school felt the joy of marking a Jewish holiday among a Jewish majority. Even if we were a different Jewish community than ones at HersheyPark who came from ultra-Orthodox enclaves, we were part of a larger community doing the same thing, each in our own way. That’s what Sukkot is supposed to help us achieve theologically, too.

The draw of our full attention to joy comes from shifting our focus away from the material and instead toward the divine. We notice nature, we feel the fall season, we make extra blessings, and we focus on hope. We hope for rain in its season, we hope for redemption, and we hope for joy. What commands our joy is drawing our full attention to the fact that we are a purposeful part of Creation. Autumn will turn to winter, AND spring will come.

To remind us the fullness of Creation, Sukkot ends with two holidays. Shemini Atzeret is understood as one-on-one time for God and Israel. It allows for us to enter Simchat Torah with a sense of completion and at-one-ness. So it is, that on Simchat Torah we finish reading the Torah and immediately start again at the beginning. Our words mirror nature. Our souls aligned to cycle through another year of living. Done right, there is much to celebrate!



On this coming Monday, the  will unroll a new paper Torah, donated by the graduating class of 2013. Our students will see the fullness of the text. We open it in a circle to emphasize the cyclical nature of the reading and of life. It is a joy to see the students’ wide eyes as they see it all at once. We also sweeten the experience with a sugary treat! May Torah always be sweet on our tongues, may this season give us hope, and may the fullness of our experiences command joy from each of us.

Chag Sameach!

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Who By Fire

Smokey P1110955Bear came to Albert Einstein Academy this week. He was a bit shy meeting all our Gan and 1st Grade students. Once they welcomed him warmly, he shook each of their hands as they promised not to play with matches. (Full disclosure: I was in the bear suit.)

The next day, health classes for every class focused on fire safety. Students made posters to remind each other how to be safe. Our 5th grade is writing essays on fire safety.

Ordinarily, the learning would be a matter of course for elementary school education. Fire safety is something we teach. We take for granted that our students learn something they may never use.

During the High Holy Days, however, fire is a more serious matter. It occupies the #2 position of ways that someone judged by God on these days will die (should that be the decree). The Unetaneh Tokef prayer famously states:

On Rosh Hashanah will be inscribed and on Yom Kippur will be sealed – how many will pass from the earth and how many will be created; who will live and who will die; who will die at his predestined time and who before his time; who by water and who by fire, who by sword, who by beast, who by famine, who by thirst, who by upheaval, who by plague, who by strangling, and who by stoning. Who will rest and who will wander, who will live in harmony and who will be harried, who will enjoy tranquility and who will suffer, who will be impoverished and who will be enriched, who will be degraded and who will be exalted. But Repentance, Prayer, and Charity avert the severity of the decree!”

Given the opening few lines and their focus on life and death, we often miss the last few lines preceding the call to act now to change the decree. Those lines reflect that life, while it does include death, is spent mostly in fluctuations of harmony or harriedness, of tranquility or suffering, in economic swings, and with rising personal and professional successes and failures. Most of life for most people is mostly in-between.

10646847_10152718666152812_2699930988453758697_nThis year, I found those last lines to be of tremendous significance. My family survived a house fire that dislocated us for nine months to a year. We spend the last weeks of the last school year in hotels and searching for a rental home. We have had to sort through countless items damaged, recovered, lost, or repurchased. We only recently have been able to cook for ourselves. With extraordinary gratitude, we lived, and we will rebuild.

In-between, where we live now, I am struck by the importance of “repentance, prayer, and charity.” We prayed and needed prayers to make it through the details (many of which still plague us). We relied upon the amazing charity of the community to feed us and to help us purchase transitional and restoration items. I apologize for using this impersonal context, but THANK YOU for sustaining us.

And then there is repentance. The Hebrew word is teshuva, literally “return.” We survived the fire by returning to the lessons our children brought home from AEA. We made a plan. In the middle of the night, when I woke to the fire, we knew what to do and did it. Smokey Bear gave us more than coloring books, and the Talleyville Fire Company gave us more than safety tips and a contest: they gave us the impetus to make a plan and, because of it, to live.

May we all return to our learning (especially if we took it for granted), return our better selves, and return to be sealed for a good year ahead.

G’mar chatimah tovah!

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Would My Mother Be Proud?



I finally did it. I got into Harvard! Seriously. I have been selected to attend Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education Principals’ Center program “Improving Schools: The Art of Leadership” as part of a cohort of Jewish day school leaders who will have additional reflection and mentoring at Harvard with a year-long project afterward, fully-funded by the AVI CHAI Foundation. My mother would be so proud!

Or would she? Yes, it is true that my teen summers in the Boston area led to the purchase of some Harvard gear, and that I fancied I might go to Harvard for college. I remember my mother encouraging my enthusiasm and exhibiting a quiet patience. I think she knew that I did not yet know myself well enough to choose the right college campus for me. In the end, I went to Swarthmore College. My mother’s charge to me as I left for Swarthmore was to take four years to learn how to think.



Now, I think she would not be proud of me getting into Harvard. She might be happy for me, but she would also wonder what going there would do for my soul. The name Harvard and even the promise of great learning would provoke a stale, “good for you” or “how exciting.” To fire her up, I would need to give a deeper reason for the value of the program.

Thankfully, AVI CHAI is providing that deeper reason: I am going to Harvard “to enhance or advance the Judaic mission of” Albert Einstein Academy (AEA). The classes will give me tools for being a better principal; and the mentoring and reflection will push me to become a better person and thereby a better leader. I am going to Harvard not just to learn how to do but also to learn how to be. Of that, my mother would be proud.

This Sunday is Mother’s Day. I miss my mother dearly. In her absence, I have come to appreciate how mothers (not exclusively, yet still significantly) are the grounding presence in children’s lives. Children learn from mothers that our origins, our history, our family, our roots, and our values are key to understanding who we are. We need this foundation and to recognize it.

One of the gifts of a Jewish day school education in the elementary years, like that of AEA, is precisely the time spent teaching those origins, history, family, roots, and values. A school is not a parent; it cannot be. A school can, however, teach more than tools; it can teach the soul paths towards flourishing. I am going to Harvard to advance that Judaic mission: teaching our students’ souls to develop journeys that lead their whole being to thrive.

I thank my mother for getting me on that path. I thank all mothers for giving their children the groundwork for purpose. I hope your children make you proud, and I hope that AEA will help them do it.



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Passover Faith

Bravery is not fearlessness; it is courage in the face of fear. When I joined 36 Rabbis Shave for the Brave, I thought the “brave” were the children fighting pediatric cancer and their families.  I did not realize that the shave would be for those who are brave. In other words, going into my shave Sunday evening, I was scared. How would my head feel? How would I look? Did I really do as good an act of righteousness or of chesed (loving kindness) as I thought? Rationally, I knew everything would be okay and worth it. Emotionally, I had a harder time. I was not dauntless; I tried to be brave.



Given the timing of my shave on the day before Erev Pesach, I was struck by the bravery of our ancestors every year as they prepared their homes for Passover. When we rid our homes of chametz (leavened foods), we know that, as soon as the holiday ends, we can go to a store and buy more. Not so for our ancestors. Getting rid of their chametz meant getting rid of their starter dough for making bread. They could not walk to the store to buy yeast after Passover; they had to wait for grain to grow, be harvested, and then to ferment. For them, cleaning for Passover was the kind of bravery we call a leap of faith. They would clean out their home, celebrate the holiday, and eat matzah until one day, weeks later, when they hoped they might make bread again. That kind of faith is a journey, a Passover faith.

When the ancient Israelites left Egypt, they did not know where they were going or how long it would take to find out. In our age of instant gratification, GPS, and strategic planning, their ancient faith is remarkable. I hope by tapping into it, it is inspirational.

courtesy of Mriaim Sandler Photography

courtesy of Mriaim Sandler Photography

My hair will grow back, slowly. I don’t need great faith to know that. I need the omer, the period of counting from the second seder to the holiday of Shavuot, to number the days that will lead me along my journey. Perhaps, I might find myself getting past bravery to Passover faith, a leap from rational calculation to the idea that life will be restored.

Just before having my head shaved, I read this prayer: “.ותעמד לנו זכות מצות גמילות חסד ואמת למלאות ימינו בטובה. וחסד ה׳ עלינו לעולם Help us attain the privilege of performing the mitzvah of gemilut hesed ve’emet—the granting of true kindness—that we may live out our days with goodness. And may God’s lovingkindness grace us forever.”

This Passover, I wish everyone the chance to perform a mitzvah of lovingkindness and to be graced with God’s lovingkindness in turn. May all of that lovingkindness redeem our world from the many forms of slavery, physical and spiritual, that plague our world today. In particular, may it remove hatred of the kind seen Sunday in Overland Park, KS and may it help us find better treatments, if not a cure, for cancer.

Chag Sameach.

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